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This Way I and This Way II, A Renovation

why

As I begin to record another journal entry, I can’t help but feel so blessed and energized by the opportunity to share with you my love of art. This blog was started in 2012. Since its inception I’ve added over 900 posts. The entry I am recording today is the fourteenth in a series I call Operation Renovation. I initiated the discussion to distract my attention from the ongoing Covid 19 “stay at home order” and to retrofit a number of my art pieces for mounting on canvas. With thirteen projects already tackled let’s move on to # 14 and 15.

A little history

Back in May, 2016, I attended a multi-day class taught by Rayna Gilman, an improv fiber artist, at the Woodland Ridge Retreat. Using the knowledge I gained I created a number of fabric building blocks; many of them were combined to form Crossroads, Art Piece # 10.

Crossroads, Art Piece # 10
Crossroads, Art Piece # 10

One of the remaining blocks became the inspiration for This Way I, Art Piece # 7, and This Way II, Art Piece # 8. Let’s take a look at both projects.

If we lay them side by side you will notice that they have obvious similarities. While they are not mirror images, you can see where the original block was sliced vertically. The left section became This Way I while the other This Way II. Both were surrounded by a soft blue border, finished with facings, hanging sleeve and label. They remained in that condition until now.

retrofitting

This Way I and This Way II were similar in size. This Way I measured 10 3/4” x 14 1/4” while This Way II was 9 1/2” x 15 1/2”. The process of retrofitting both involved stripping away their facings, hanging sleeve, etc. Next I whacked away at their blue borders until they were nearly identical in size. To spruce up their appearance I chose three different colored fabrics. First to be added was a burnt orange. Giving the smoky orange competition is a jazzy gold. Last to be added was a fruity purple with printed flowers. Each color was chosen to bring attention to those already incorporated in the pieced center. The purple, although primarily visible on the perpendicular edges gives each fiber art quilt a joyful pop of color.

The final measurements for the two partners is 16” x 20”. Both were embellished with straight line quilting in the burnt orange border and a grouping of wavy lines in the jazzy gold.

assigning an identity

The names given to identify the fiber art quilts resulted because of the colorful angled strips used in the assembling of their centers. Those strips reminded me of the directional arrows one might observe on a road sign. The sign provides guidance on how to proceed just as I felt the angled strips were advising me. Since there are two siblings I decided to make their names unique by adding a I and a II at the end.

thank you!

I can’t sign off without expressing my sincere appreciation for your interest in my journal and the many projects I share. Your participation is absolutely necessary to the continued success of this platform. With much certainty, I am confident that you have questions or comments you would like to contribute. Thank you in advance for sharing them.

About Cindy

The world of art has always brought me joy. From my childhood explorations with chalk and paint to my creations using fabric and thread, I have utilized art as my vehicle to stretch my wings and explore the world around me.

My favorite art form has been given many names; I know it as “free-form” quilting. This direction has taken me on a journey resulting in the formation of more than 200 art pieces. Most of them center strictly around the manipulation of fabric. Some of the later pieces have added elements of hand stitchery. All of them have brought me an immense sense of joy.

I use this blog to share glimpses of my art and the environment in which it is created. Most of my art pieces are available for purchase. You may see a sampling of them at Raven’s Wish Gallery in Janesville, Wisconsin.

My art is periodically on display in a variety of venues. To learn about my current exhibits you may send an email to cindy [at] inastitchquilting [dot] com

Now go and create your own masterpiece. With warm hugs…

Cindy Anderson

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Minimalist Design

What is it?

Any design or style in which the simplest and fewest elements are used to create the maximum effect.

Minimal Quiltmaking by Gwen Marston

Early in June I took a class taught by Pam Beal. The class title was

Minimalist Design, Maximum Impact.

I’ve been experimenting with fabric for decades.

My path began with structured piecing using quilt patterns and rigid measurements. From there I turned to impromptu piecing.

My first introduction to minimalist design was through a book written by Rayna Gillman and reinforced by a class of hers.

Pam says she is

an improvisational quilter from the Liberated School of Design.

I enjoyed listening to and learning from Pam. Here’s one of her wonderful quilts.

Lilly Pad A LA Mode
Lily Pad A LA Mode, 24” x 38 1/2”, 2013. Designed, made and hand quilted in a floor frame by Pam J. Beal, Mass City, Michigan.

While at the class I created a number of small art pieces. Some of them used colors and combinations that were out of my comfort zone.

The mini projects, numbering at least 16, are anxious to meet you.

Be watching for their debut.

Blessings to you!

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The Last of the Salvage: Lilly’s Rising Star, AP # 63

Rediscovered

I’ve been sharing stories of my recent endeavors to revive and finish a large group of art pieces. This last one, the 20th piece to be revealed since mid July, was actually a finished block leftover from the 2016 class taught by Rayna Gillman. It was one of the last minute throw togethers just before the end of the session. For some unknown reason I had stuffed it into a box and lost track of it. During my frenzy to finish a bunch of projects I rediscovered the mini quilt.

Lilly's Rising Star, AP # 63
Lilly’s Rising Star, AP # 63

Its Construction

Two years have gone by since I assembled this mini quilt. With the passing of all those months, most of the details of my construction process have long-since been forgotten. All that I can share with you are the materials I used as well as the finishing touches .

The art piece measures 10 3/4” long “ x 7 1/2” wide. The main fabric in the center of the tiny art piece was harvested from an old woven curtain. The balance of the fabrics were scraps leftover from other projects.

Beneath the quilt top is a layer of Warm & Natural batting. The fabric for the backing was originally part of a kit. After deciding to not assemble the intended project I made it my mission to repurpose all of the fabrics. The backing on this mini quilt was one of them. I used my Pfaff sewing machine to quilt a simple linear pattern. The thread colors chosen coordinated nicely with my fabrics.

The raw edges of my mini quilt were wrapped with a facing made from the same fabric used for the backing. Once those were complete I finished my project by adding a hanging sleeve along with a label.

A New Home

I have an over-abundance of mini art pieces just waiting for a home. After completing this art piece I decided to offer it to my family. This one seemed like it had the most potential to be adopted. In a matter of minutes my oldest granddaughter made her claim.

My granddaughter told her mom she wanted to start an art gallery in their basement (she is 10). On display, in her art gallery, will be this quilt. Miss L asked her mom to find out the quilt’s name. The information was needed in order for her mom to help her make a label; the kind they make for art on display in exhibits. How sweet is that!

An Amazing Young Lady

Miss L is a very sweet young lady.  She is the middle child of three; very sensible; and a peace keeper between her siblings. Miss L is just beginning to take an interest in baking and has been experimenting with recipes from a book they borrowed from the library. In honor of Miss L’s rising potential I am calling this art piece Lilly’s Rising Star, AP # 63. The plus sign reminds me of Lilly spreading her wings to experience and learn new things.

A Note to Miss L

Dear Miss L,

Thank You for your interest in my art! I hope that someday you will look back on this tiny art piece with a warm feeling in your heart and a smile on your face. You have added so much joy to my life.

Nana ♥️

Thank You!

This post wraps up a long and winding adventure. Twenty finished art pieces is quite and accomplishment to brag about. However, believe it or not, there are many, many more just like it waiting for their turn.

To you, my reader, I say Thank You for traveling along on this journey! Your presence makes sharing these stories so much more meaningful! Until next time…

Talk with you soon!

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Awesome Opportunity!

From My Garden

Quite some time ago I told you of an opportunity I had to attend a retreat with Rayna Gillman. Well that time has finally arrived! I’ve spent days getting my supplies ready, my car is packed and I’m ready to go. I will share my adventures soon.

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Overjoyed!

I am absolutely beyond excited to share a wonderful opportunity!

Regular followers of my blog may remember that I am a BIG fan of free-form quilting. In fact I have often mentioned one of my favorite artists, Rayna Gilman, author of Create Your Own Free-Form Quilts, on many occasions.

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In May of this year Rayna will be teaching at a retreat.

Rayna Gillman Retreat

Guess who’s going? That’s right! ME!