Itty Bitty, AP # 78


I am excited to be sharing another finished art project. Today’s item was started during my adventures with Pam Beal at her class Minimalist Design, Maximum Impact.

Being only 2 1/2 x 2 1/2” in size I’m absolutely certain you can figure out the reason for her name. This teeny tiny specimen was made from one of my leftover scraps.

Itty Bitty certainly meets the criteria for minimalism:

a style or technique that is characterized by extreme spareness and simplicity

Miriam-Webster

Being so small, Itty Bitty doesn’t need a fancy introduction. All of her features can easily be seen in the photo below. Say hello to Itty Bitty, AP # 78!

Itty Bitty, AP # 78

Hoo Knows? AP # 77


While attending Pam Beal’s class Minimalist Design, Maximum Impact,I began a number of small art pieces. Some of them have already been shared.

Blue Door, AP # 66

1973, AP # 74

X’s and O’s, AP # 75

Wise Old Owl, AP # 76

Today’s small art piece was also started in that class. Titled Who Hoo Knows?, AP # 77, the quilt measures 15×10”.

Who Hoo Knows?, AP # 77

Keeping with the theme of minimalism, this petite specimen has a limited color pallet. The soft minty teal (how’s that for a technical description) adds a pop of color that grabs your eye and draws it toward the center.

Of note are several special embellishments. Except for the zig-zagged raw edges of the sparkly grey fabric the rest of the quilting was hand stitched. Added for surprise elements were three teal and black beads along with a sassy, teal owl. The colors of the items were chosen to mirror the minty fabric frame.

Naming this mini quilt proved to be a challenge. Often times a name will come to mind while I am creating my art. In this case I wasn’t inspired until I added the owl. Given the difficulty I had in choosing the name I decided to select Hoo Knows?. Hoo, because of the sound associated with owls and the added owl bead. Knows, because of the phrase, “Who Knows?” I know it seems kind of corny but that’s ok! Who cares!

Hoo Knows was added to a background of black fabric. A layer of Warm & Natural batting is sandwiched in-between. To the quilt’s raw edges a binding of matching black fabric was added.

What do you think of my latest art piece?

Thank you for visiting!

Plans for 2019


I like to sew.

A lot!

Sewing brings me joy and keeps my creative mind engaged and happy.

Being a multitasker, I often have more than one project going. My design wall is currently home to my unfinished VFW Double Wedding Ring

My Double Wedding Ring Quilt

and

a Storm Star Quilt.

My Star Storm Quilt

Both are awaiting quilting.

My smaller design board displays the building blocks for one my latest improv quilts.

Red and Teal, A Challenge, AP # 95

This is another in-progress art piece. This one was started during a Heidi Parkes class I took at Blue Bar Quilts. Here’s a sneak peek.

Central Park, AP # 96

In multiple plastic storage tubs are other items waiting for my attention. Some have been started while others look the same way they did when I brought them home.

During 2019 I’ve made a personal goal to work-on and finish as many projects as possible. Many of my unfinished items have been gathered into tubs. Those tubs will be taken to a February quilting retreat. I know that I have packed way more projects than I could ever dream of completing but that doesn’t upset me. Having more than necessary gives me the opportunity to adjust my focus if I get bored.

Even though I have a very long list of items to complete it didn’t stop me from adding several more. So far this year I have added:

Victoria Findlay Wolfe Off the Cuff Block of the Month

A Different Box of Crayons Bricolage Block of the Month

An EPP project

and, last but not least a block of the month challenge (see my Red and Teal photo above) with one of my friends.

2019, like all other years, will be an amazing adventure!

Wise Old Owl


One of the joys of finishing an art piece is sharing it with you. My most recent finish is a piece titled Wise Old Owl, AP # 76. Read on to discover it’s details.

The Beginning

I participated in Pam Beal’s class Minimalist Design, Maximum Impact back in the spring of 2018. The specimen being shown today was started during that class.

This quilt, as with many others, started from leftover scraps. If you refer to the photo below you will see them in the center of the art piece. They are the dangling strips of random fabrics. This odd grouping adds an unexpected point of interest. Further interest was added through these special features:

  • Three Stitches: In the quilt’s uppermost area you will notice three stitches. Pam often adds elements of surprise to her masterpieces. These three stitches are my surprise touch.
  • One Bead: Adding further excitement is the addition of an unusual single teal bead. The bead was purchased from Etsy long before I began this project. Since then I had been waiting for just the right opportunity to use it. This project seemed like the perfect place.
  • Three Small Beads: The goal of a balanced quilt is evenly distributed color. To spread the presence of teal in yet another location, three small teal beads were stitched to the black horizontal fabric strip.
  • Zigzag Stitch: The grouping of fabric strips with uneven lengths and varied colors have raw edges. Normally raw edges would be secured inside a seam. Since these were not I added a row of zigzag stitching to prevent unraveling.
  • Black Strip: Although it may be hard to tell the horizontal black strip extends beyond the mini quilt’s edges on both sides. Each end of the strip was stitched together to protect the unfinished edges.

The Name

Here’s why I’ve named my piece Wise Old Owl:

  • The teal triangle reminds me of eyebrows.
  • The two small grey triangles, on either side of the eyebrows, look like eyes,
  • The short black vertical strip of fabric beneath the eyes forms a beak.
  • The horizontal black strips extending beyond the sides of the quilt look like outstretched wings.

Finishing Touches

Ms. Wise Old Owl has a black binding to protect her delicate edges. Her backside is covered with a matching black fabric. Inside she is kept warm by a layer of Warm & Natural batting. She measures 13 x 8″.

Wise Old Owl, AP # 76
A Closer Look at some of the Owl’s Details

Thank You for visiting!

X’s and O’s, AP # 75


Sidetracked

Before heading to Woodland Ridge for Pam Beal’s class, I stopped in Menomonie at the cutest little fabric shop called Thread Lab. The art piece I will share today incorporates three of the fabrics purchased during my shopping spree.

Undivided Attention

This is the third post featuring art quilts resulting from my attendance at Pam Beal’s class Minimalist Design, Maximum Impact.

One of the concepts I learned there was

“L” Shape Balance.

What??

Those that read and write the English language are familiar with the letter “L”. The “L” begins with a downward swipe of the pen, then continues on toward the right. These two lines form a ninety degree angle.

The English language is read from top to bottom and left to right. This top to bottom, left to right flow is replicated in the letter “L”. When viewing art our eye travels along the same path.

Lets Review

If you recall, I mentioned earlier one of the traits Pam said was important for a successful art piece. The term I am referring to is “L” Shape Balance. If my quilt were to achieve “L” Shape Balance then my eye would begin in the top left corner and proceed across and down the surface.

I believe my mini art piece achieves that balance. The blue fabric, situated to the left of the center, echoes the downward movement of a pen creating the first part of an “L”. The grey fabric directly below can be identified with the left to right swipe.

Did I loose you?

In other words, my eye first travels from top to bottom down the surface of the blue fabric. Next it makes a right angle and follows along the grey strip to the outer right edge.

Is that better?

X’s and O’s

X’s and O’s are often used to signify a hug and a kiss when writing sentiments in, say for instance—a card. I’ve titled today’s art piece X’s and O’s not because I’m sending you a kiss or a hug. Instead I’ve chosen this reference because of the fabrics I used to create it.

X's and O's
X’s and O’s, AP # 75

If you look closely in the body of my piece you will see skinny strips of fabric accentuated by the letter “X”. You will also notice a blue fabric decorated with black dots. The “X’s” and dots, or “O’s” were the inspiration for my quilt’s name.

What’s Left?

Let’s look at the remaining features of my art piece. This small art quilt was made using three different colors—black, grey and blue. The

  • blue fabric with the black dots;
  • the grey and black fabric with the x’s; and
  • the darker grey and black near the bottom

were purchased during my fabric shopping trip. The balance of the other fabrics were harvested from my stash.

Hand Quilted

Years and years ago I tried mastering the art of hand quilting. After several attempts I threw in the towel and turned to machine quilting. Hand quilting is Pam’s preferred method. After seeing Pam’s masterpieces and how lovely they looked with her stitching I decided to give it another try.

Thread Colors

I chose three thread colors for my stitching.

  • The grey fabrics were accented with grey thread.
  • Black thread was my obvious choice for the two black border pieces.
  • In the remaining sections I used a soft blue.

After achieving a workable rhythm I actually grew to appreciate hand quilting. The somewhat uneven appearance of my stitches gives my small project a more rustic texture.

Surprise!

Strategically placed stray stitches along with random beading are Pam’s go-to-method for adding elements of surprise. Using this for my inspiration I added a few stray stitches along with four French knots in the quilt’s right, grey panel. These two elements add a little sparkle.

The Little Things

Now that we have examined the obvious details let’s take one last look at the unmentioned features.

  • X’s and O’s measures 14” L x 8 5/8“ w.
  • Surrounding my quilt is a binding made from black fabric.
  • In between the quilt sandwich is a layer of Warm & Natural batting.
  • The back is protected by a layer of black fabric.
  • A hanging sleeve and label have been attached as well.

That’s A Wrap

With so much to share, this has been a very long post. I think you would agree though that it was well worth the read.

Thank you so much for sticking with me. Let’s do this again!

logo_101417_2