The Blue House, Art Piece 115


Way back in August, 2014 I was on a mission to transform an ugly quilt top into something beautiful. The center of the quilt top contained a block with a blue house. The blue house was my biggest obstacle.

The Blue House Renovation

After carefully disassembling the multiple borders and harvesting the blue house I began the process of its reincarnation. Over an extended period of time a number of new art quilts were created. This project titled The Blue House, Art Piece # 115 was one of them.

The Blue House, Art Piece # 115

Upon close inspection, of the above photo, you will notice where some of the fragments were incorporated. Securing those sections together were angled strips of fabric. Added for embellishment were several buttons, a teal floral rick rack, as well as machine and hand quilting. A gray binding was added to all four edges. On the back is a blue cotton print fabric, a fabric hanging sleeve and a label containing identifying information.

I am very proud to add this early experiment in ugly block transformation to my portfolio. Thank you for being present.

With warm wishes for a wonderful day!

Testing 1, 2, 3 Art Piece 114


Quite some time ago I participated in a class taught by Pam Beal at Woodland Ridge Retreat. The class Minimal Design, Maximum Impact focused on creating fiber art pieces that use a limited pallet of colors and/or design features. Today’s reveal has a limited color pallet but definitely not a limited number of stitches.

Testing 1, 2, 3 was assembled from test samples of four different construction methods: fabric strip manipulation, triangles, fractured circles and wedge piecing. All four were merged together to form this art quilt. The new creation was then surrounded by a border of black cotton fabric. Added for embellishment were four wool circles and a myriad of hand quilting stitches. Perle cotton was the primary thread used. To complete the fiber quilt an envelope of black cotton fabric was added to the back along with a hanging sleeve and a label with identifying features. Measuring 20 1/4” x 12 1/4” Testing 1, 2, 3 may be minimal in size but nowhere near minimal in impact.

Testing 1, 2, 3, Art Piece # 114

Thank you for showing your support by visiting my blog. I look forward to our continued relationship and your future comments.

With warm wishes for a wonderful day!

Relaxed Fit, Art Piece 112


What do you think of when you hear the words relaxed fit? For me it conjures up a comfy pair of denim blue jeans. Now what do those two words have to do with the art piece I am about to reveal? Read on and you will see.

June, 2019 I had the opportunity to attend QSDS (Quilt, Surface and Design Symposium) at the college of arts in Columbus, Ohio. It was the second time I attended their summer program. One of the instructors I chose to study under was Lisa Binkley. Lisa is a fiber artist from Wisconsin. She is well known for her eco-dyed fabrics, elaborate beading and hand stitching. Even though I know Lisa personally and can visit her locally I decided to attend her two-day class.

The name of her class was In the Boro Sprit. If you have read my last two posts about additions to my portfolio then you are aware of my recent exposure to the technique known as Boro stitching. The posts A Boro Collage, Art Piece # 110 and Black, White and Gray, Art Piece # 111 both discuss items I have made following that practice.

During Lisa’s class she discussed the characteristics of a Boro item, shared examples of its application and gave demonstrations of the stitching. During the remainder of the class we applied our knowledge by creating our own brand new art piece.

Along with items from our own inventory we were encouraged to include specimens from Lisa’s array of fabrics. One of the items I decided to include was from a pair of my old blue jeans. The jeans, well-worn and tattered from hours of use, had the label containing the trade brand of Relaxed Fit. Lisa often uses labels from discarded clothing to embellish her projects. Following in my teacher’s footsteps, I too decided to do the same. The label caught my eye because it reminded me of the relaxed nature (raw-edged appearance) of the scraps that would potentially be added to my piece. From that moment on I just knew it would receive a predominant place on my art quilt.

Relaxed Fit was assembled using pieces of denim from my old blue jeans (you can still see the stains from hours of gardening on my knees), sections of eco-dyed fabrics I made while attending one of Lisa’s other classes, scraps of silk organza leftover from previous projects, segments of lace harvested from larger items, fragments of old neck ties, hints of the old quilt secured on the back, and kantha cloth I purchased from the internet (kantha cloth is fragments of old saris layered on top of one another then hand-stitched together). Sandwiched beneath my fabric design is a section of an old quilt I rescued from oblivion years ago.

The many layers that comprise my fiber art piece were hand-stitched together using complimentary colors of Perle cotton thread. No attempt was made to hide knots either on top, inside or on the bottom of my art quilt. In some places threads were deliberately unraveled and left to dangle freely. As you peruse the surface of the quilt you will also discover lengths of Perle cotton that extend beyond anchoring knots. They too add elements of design not seen in a typical quilt. Surrounding all four sides is a binding of black cotton fabric.

A glance at the back of this amazingly unique art piece reveals the erratic twists and turns taken by my stitching. Without the distraction of multi-colored fabrics, the individual stitches are allowed to exude their own art element. Also included on the back is a fabric sleeve for hanging as well as a label with identifying features. This unique one-of-a-kind fiber art piece is incredibly soft. The nature of the used fabrics combined with the backing of the old quilt meld together to create the pleasing softness.

All of the distinguishing features of Relaxed Fit, Art Piece # 112 have made this an art piece that outshines any other.

This fiber art piece has made a wonderful addition to my portfolio. I am so grateful that you were here to join in my reveal.

With warm wishes for a wonderful day!

Black White and Gray, Art Piece 111


Many times, after learning a new skill, I find myself making multiple fiber art pieces using the same techniques. Today’s reveal is an example of that tendency. Black, White, and Gray, Art Piece # 111 was assembled using the Boro stitching lessons I learned through Maday Delgado. I had the wonderful privilege of taking one of her classes in March, 2019 at Blue Bar Quilts. The First item to result from her teachings was A Boro Collage, Art Piece # 110.

This second specimen focused on the color pallet of white, black and gray. Having never made a fiber piece with just those three colors, I decided to use the concept on this item. Black, White and Gray, just as with A Boro Collage, was created from raw edged fabric scraps. Except for a few synthetic fiber fabrics most of the scraps contained within this art quilt are 100% cotton. The scraps vary in size and pattern. The Boro stitching was applied with similarly colored Perle cotton thread using somewhat parallel lines. Almost all of the knots used to secure beginning and ending points in the stitching are displayed on the front of the piece. Occasionally a tale of extra thread was left to dangle freely; adding an unexpected element of interest. The outer edges of my art piece were surrounded by a white on black cotton binding. On the back is a fabric sleeve for hanging as well as a label with identifying features. The varied colors, stitching and fabric designs give this fiber art piece a one-of-a-kind appearance.

Black White and, Gray, Art Piece # 111

I hope that you enjoyed reading about and seeing this lovely addition to my portfolio. Inspired to share your thoughts? You can express your feelings by adding a comment.

With warm wishes for a wonderful day!

I think it was successful


I recently wrote a post about a new-to-me method I wanted to explore. Should I touched on the topic of using stretched canvas to finish an art piece. I’ve heard and read so much about the concept that I decided to give it a try.

The first specimen for my experiment was this one.

Experiment # 1

Before I could proceed I had to make a number of decisions:

  • Determine current size
  • What should the final dimensions be
  • How much extra fabric would I have to add
  • Should I add batting behind the extra fabric
  • Did I want to quilt the extra fabric
  • Should I finish the raw edges of the added fabric

Once I answered all those questions I had to implement my plan. The process of checking off each of the items on my list went rather smoothly.

The next hurdle was the actual mounting on the canvas. I watched several YouTube videos and read quite a few blog posts about this topic. The videos were the most helpful. The video by Leila Gardunia was my favorite. I lost track of the number of times that I watched it. When I felt confident I could actually attempt to proceed I located our staple gun and extra staples and set the wheels in motion. Being a perfectionist I took a few try’s before I was satisfied. In the end I was rather pleased with the outcome. This is how my canvas mounted art quilt looked when I was finished.

Minimalism I, Art Piece # 193

Completing my first go-around with this method gave me the confidence to proceed with my second and third, and well you get the picture. Who knows…this just might be my go-to technique for all my fiber art creations.

This probably isn’t the last time you will hear me mention the topic of canvas mounted artwork. If you want to stay up-to-date with my progress then subscribe to my blog.

With warm wishes for an art filled day!