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This Way I and This Way II, A Renovation

why

As I begin to record another journal entry, I can’t help but feel so blessed and energized by the opportunity to share with you my love of art. This blog was started in 2012. Since its inception I’ve added over 900 posts. The entry I am recording today is the fourteenth in a series I call Operation Renovation. I initiated the discussion to distract my attention from the ongoing Covid 19 “stay at home order” and to retrofit a number of my art pieces for mounting on canvas. With thirteen projects already tackled let’s move on to # 14 and 15.

A little history

Back in May, 2016, I attended a multi-day class taught by Rayna Gilman, an improv fiber artist, at the Woodland Ridge Retreat. Using the knowledge I gained I created a number of fabric building blocks; many of them were combined to form Crossroads, Art Piece # 10.

Crossroads, Art Piece # 10
Crossroads, Art Piece # 10

One of the remaining blocks became the inspiration for This Way I, Art Piece # 7, and This Way II, Art Piece # 8. Let’s take a look at both projects.

If we lay them side by side you will notice that they have obvious similarities. While they are not mirror images, you can see where the original block was sliced vertically. The left section became This Way I while the other This Way II. Both were surrounded by a soft blue border, finished with facings, hanging sleeve and label. They remained in that condition until now.

retrofitting

This Way I and This Way II were similar in size. This Way I measured 10 3/4” x 14 1/4” while This Way II was 9 1/2” x 15 1/2”. The process of retrofitting both involved stripping away their facings, hanging sleeve, etc. Next I whacked away at their blue borders until they were nearly identical in size. To spruce up their appearance I chose three different colored fabrics. First to be added was a burnt orange. Giving the smoky orange competition is a jazzy gold. Last to be added was a fruity purple with printed flowers. Each color was chosen to bring attention to those already incorporated in the pieced center. The purple, although primarily visible on the perpendicular edges gives each fiber art quilt a joyful pop of color.

The final measurements for the two partners is 16” x 20”. Both were embellished with straight line quilting in the burnt orange border and a grouping of wavy lines in the jazzy gold.

assigning an identity

The names given to identify the fiber art quilts resulted because of the colorful angled strips used in the assembling of their centers. Those strips reminded me of the directional arrows one might observe on a road sign. The sign provides guidance on how to proceed just as I felt the angled strips were advising me. Since there are two siblings I decided to make their names unique by adding a I and a II at the end.

thank you!

I can’t sign off without expressing my sincere appreciation for your interest in my journal and the many projects I share. Your participation is absolutely necessary to the continued success of this platform. With much certainty, I am confident that you have questions or comments you would like to contribute. Thank you in advance for sharing them.

About Cindy

The world of art has always brought me joy. From my childhood explorations with chalk and paint to my creations using fabric and thread, I have utilized art as my vehicle to stretch my wings and explore the world around me.

My favorite art form has been given many names; I know it as “free-form” quilting. This direction has taken me on a journey resulting in the formation of more than 200 art pieces. Most of them center strictly around the manipulation of fabric. Some of the later pieces have added elements of hand stitchery. All of them have brought me an immense sense of joy.

I use this blog to share glimpses of my art and the environment in which it is created. Most of my art pieces are available for purchase. You may see a sampling of them at Raven’s Wish Gallery in Janesville, Wisconsin.

My art is periodically on display in a variety of venues. To learn about my current exhibits you may send an email to cindy [at] inastitchquilting [dot] com

Now go and create your own masterpiece. With warm hugs…

Cindy Anderson

Posted on 4 Comments

Moo, Art Piece 9 Renovation

what’s in a name

I’ve been known to assign some very odd names to my art pieces; case in point this one. Who calls an art quilt MOO? Obviously me! A gal has to have a little fun doesn’t she!

Want to know what inspired me to use this name? If you look really closely at the right side of the pieced center you will notice a strip of dark blue fabric. Repeatedly printed on the material is the word moo. The presence of that simple three letter word gave me the idea for my art quilt’s name.

the project continues

Out of a desire to overcome my frustrations with the “stay at home covid 19” directive I decided to occupy my time with Operation Renovation. So what is Operation Renovation? I love making changes; whether it be to my home decor, my hair or my wardrobe it all helps to keep things fresh and exciting. The same concept can be applied to my art. Even though I have an inventory of fiber art quilts that are already finished that doesn’t mean they will stay that way. Almost anything can be changed. With that mindset I decided to select a grouping of small finished fabric art pieces to retrofit for mounting on a stretched canvas. The journey to accomplish that task is called Operation Renovation.

the next subject

One would think that after successfully renovating eleven of my art quilts that I would have exhausted the possible candidates. Oh but quite the contrary! Including today’s subject I have at least eight more.

The item I’m sharing in this journal entry is a fraternal twin to my last project On The Diagonal I. So far we know the reason why Moo, Art Piece # 9 was given its name and that it has a partner but what else can we learn; let’s figure that out.

the nitty gritty

Moo was one of nine projects created way back in 2016. The base, or pieced center, was harvested from a much larger building block. The first section of that block was used to create On The Diagonal I and the remaining portion was utilized for Moo.

To adapt Moo for mounting on a stretched canvas frame I first had to strip away the facings, hanging sleeve and label. After exposing the four raw edges I began making plans for the next steps.

In its original form, Moo measured 10 1/4” x 14 1/2”. The targeted size I wanted to achieve was 16” x 20”. To accomplish those dimensions additional fabric had to be added to both the top/bottom edges as well as both sides. I was able to succeed with that mission by incorporating two new borders.

The First border

The first border was created from a lime green fabric with aqua polka dots. Regular readers of my journal have become very familiar with my craving for dotted fabrics. Finding the aqua polka dotted material was a win, win situation. Not only did it add one of my favorite elements but it also incorporated two of my favorite colors.

the second border

The second border was fashioned from a multi-toned, delightfully ripe, purple batik. The colors in both this fabric as well as that of the first border are replicated in numerous areas of the pieced center. This techniques is important because it provides a path for the eye to travel around the art piece rather than remaining stagnate in one area. The replication also brings unity to the design and overall visual impact.

finishing touches

Before stapling the newly outfitted quilt to the stretched canvas frame I stitched rows of quilting on the two new borders. On the polka dotted border I stitched a simple straight line motif and on the outer border I added flowing lines of quilting. All of the stitching was done using color coordinated threads.

the final piece

After completing the renovation process I decided to give Moo a new identity. Since it originated from the same building block as On The Diagonal I I wanted to acknowledge that by giving Moo a similar name. From here on out Moo will be known as On The Diagonal II, Art Piece # 9. The phrase “On The Diagonal” is a reference to the numerous diagonally placed strips of fabric found in the body of the art quilt.

the reveal

After revealing most of the newly added design features I think it is time to share a before and after photo. Take a look!

Moo, Art Piece # 9 Before Renovation
Moo, Art Piece # 9 Before Renovation
On The Diagonal, Art Piece # 9 After Renovation
On The Diagonal, Art Piece # 9 After Renovation

thank you!

I can’t sign off without expressing my sincere appreciation for your interest in my journal and the many projects I share. Your participation is absolutely necessary to the continued success of this platform. With much certainty, I am confident that you have questions or comments you would like to contribute. Thank you in advance for sharing them.

About Cindy

The world of art has always brought me joy. From my childhood explorations with chalk and paint to my creations using fabric and thread, I have utilized art as my vehicle to stretch my wings and explore the world around me.

My favorite art form has been given many names; I know it as “free-form” quilting. This direction has taken me on a journey resulting in the formation of more than 200 art pieces. Most of them center strictly around the manipulation of fabric. Some of the later pieces have added elements of hand stitchery. All of them have brought me an immense sense of joy.

I use this blog to share glimpses of my art and the environment in which it is created. Most of my art pieces are available for purchase. You may see a sampling of them at Raven’s Wish Gallery in Janesville, Wisconsin.

My art is periodically on display in a variety of venues. To learn about my current exhibits you may send an email to cindy [at] inastitchquilting [dot] com

Now go and create your own masterpiece. With warm hugs…

Cindy Anderson

Posted on 12 Comments

Flowers, Art Piece 4 Renovation

Status Quo or make a change

Are you a status quo person or do you like to make changes? I would have to answer with, “It depends.” Most of the time I welcome change with open arms. There are, however, some things that I like to remain static:

-like my coffee…don’t mess with the strength or flavor

-chocolate…don’t bother giving me anything but extra dark, fair trade chocolate

-my fabric inventory..don’t tell me I have to cut back on fabric purchases

I think you get the picture.

When it comes to moving furniture, my art, my wardrobe or my haircut I’m ready to make a change.

Operation renovation

I’ve been making progress on a project I call Operation Renovation. I initiated the activity earlier this year. Being bored with the “stay at home” quarantine due to Covid 19 I was desperate for something new to occupy my time. After learning about and perfecting the skill of mounting fiber art onto stretched canvas frames I made the decision to utilize that expertise to reinvent a number of the items in my portfolio. This activity would certainly help to fill some of my time.

Ten so far

I am proud to say that I have to-date successfully renovated ten art pieces. The specimen I am sharing today is my eleventh installment. This piece, originally created back in June, 2016, was given the name Flowers, Art Piece # 4. The name was chosen because of the multiple incorporated floral fabrics .

Flowers began with leftover scraps from a former quilt block. Those scraps were also utilized to create a companion to Flowers known as Moo, Art Piece # 9.

the process

After stripping away the facings, hanging sleeve and label I set to work auditioning fabrics for new borders. Chosen were a golden yellow and a lively purple. Both colors bring harmony to the art quilt because of their presence in the original pieced center. These added components incorporate an element of pizazz that breathes new life into this work of art. To add further interest I used coordinating threads to quilt geometric shapes on the golden border and flowing lines on the purple batik.

a new name

With a new wardrobe comes a new name. Rather than keep the previous name of Flowers I decided to give the refurbished art quilt a new identity. Using the numerous diagonal lines seen in the body of the item for inspiration I chose to call the newly redecorated fiber art quilt On the Diagonal I.

the new and improved version

Explaining in detail the numerous changes that were made during the redecorating project can’t begin to hold a candle to a before and after photo. Feast your eyes on the following pictures.

Flowers, Art Piece # 4 Before Renovation
Flowers, Art Piece # 4 Before Renovation
On The Diagonal I, Art Piece # 4 After Renovation

it is finished

The process of renovating On The Diagonal I has officially been declared complete and I am absolutely thrilled with the final outcome. But patting myself on the back and singing my own praises can’t substitute for the opinions shared by my readers. I hope that you will feel inspired to add your thoughts by commenting on this journal post.

thank you!

I look forward to the time we get to spend together through this journal. Thank you for making it a rewarding experience.

About Cindy

The world of art has always brought me joy. From my childhood explorations with chalk and paint to my creations using fabric and thread, I have utilized art as my vehicle to stretch my wings and explore the world around me.

My favorite art form has been given many names; I know it as “free-form” quilting. This direction has taken me on a journey resulting in the formation of more than 200 art pieces. Most of them center strictly around the manipulation of fabric. Some of the later pieces have added elements of hand stitchery. All of them have brought me an immense sense of joy.

I use this blog to share glimpses of my art and the environment in which it is created. Most of my art pieces are available for purchase. You may see a sampling of them at Raven’s Wish Gallery in Janesville, Wisconsin.

My art is periodically on display in a variety of venues. To learn about my current exhibits you may send an email to cindy [at] inastitchquilting [dot] com

Now go and create your own masterpiece. With warm hugs…

Cindy Anderson

Posted on 6 Comments

Tropical Punch, Art Piece 79 Renovation

Making changes

Change does not have to be expensive; in fact it can cost you absolutely nothing. That’s what happens when I set-out to rearrange the furniture in my space. I am very fond of moving a chair here or a table there just to add a new vibe to a room. The impact of making such tiny adjustments can add so much flair to your environment yet add no expense to your budget.

I’ve been making changes to items in my portfolio since early this year. The changes are part of a movement I call Operation Renovation. Although not all of the tweaking has been without expense, the majority of the supplies have come from my present inventory.

The newest item to have been tackled measured 5 3/4” x 8 1/2”. Known as Tropical Punch, Art Piece 79 it was one of the tiniest members of the family. Let’s take a look at what transpired during the metamorphosis.

The transformation

The small footprint of Tropical Punch did not mean it had a quiet existence. The audacious color combination gave it an air of excitement unequaled by any other item in my portfolio. Even though its exuberant existence brought a smile to my heart anytime I saw it, I just knew I could add even more sparkle. So, I set out too harvest a few boisterous fabrics to add even more life to this already dancing gal.

Selected were three new borders; a jazzy yellow and gold stripe, a vibrant sour green and a tropical floral batik print. Giving those three a hug is a calming blue that echoes a color already used in the original design. Each of the added fabrics were embellished with straight-line stitching using matching colored threads. In its new form, Tropical Punch measures 16” x 20”. All of the enhancements, when combined together, add a punch that grabs your attention and doesn’t let go. The newly renovated Tropical Punch truly lives up to its name.

see for yourself

Tropical Punch, Art Piece # 79 Before Renovation
Tropical Punch, Art Piece # 79 Before Renovation
Tropical Punch, Art Piece # 79 After Renovation
Tropical Punch, Art Piece # 79 After Renovation

Now doesn’t that just make you smile from ear to ear!

thank you!

I’m so glad we had this opportunity to catchup and witness the reveal of yet another amazing transformation. I know that you are clamoring to share your enthusiasm so why not put it in writing by adding a comment. I would love to read your feedback.

About Cindy

The world of art has always brought me joy. From my childhood explorations with chalk and paint to my creations using fabric and thread, I have utilized art as my vehicle to stretch my wings and explore the world around me.

My favorite art form has been given many names; I know it as “free-form” quilting. This direction has taken me on a journey resulting in the formation of more than 200 art pieces. Most of them center strictly around the manipulation of fabric. Some of the later pieces have added elements of hand stitchery. All of them have brought me an immense sense of joy.

I use this blog to share glimpses of my art and the environment in which it is created. Most of my art pieces are available for purchase. You may see a sampling of them at Raven’s Wish Gallery in Janesville, Wisconsin.

My art is periodically on display in a variety of venues. To learn about my current exhibits you may send an email to cindy [at] inastitchquilting [dot] com

Now go and create your own masterpiece. With warm hugs…

Cindy Anderson

Posted on 1 Comment

Fuzzy, Art Piece 62 Renovation

Edge Treatments

Fiber art quilts typically have raw edges that need finishing. There are four common techniques used to address their edges:

-leave them raw

-add a binding

-add facings

-attach it to a stretched canvas frame.

I have tried all of the above options except the first one. I’m not opposed to leaving some of the components within my art creation raw but the idea of leaving all four of the outer edges untouched is not something I am comfortable with…yet.

Favorite Method

Of all the techniques mentioned above my favorite way to finish raw edges is to attach my art quilts to a stretched canvas. I started using this method earlier this year after being frustrated with the final outcome of many of my projects. The new-to-me concept has provided a tool that has consistently produced a professionally polished look.

The Project

After experimenting with the canvas mounting process I decided to launch a project to retrofit a number of my existing art quilts for framing. The project…Operation Renovation… has thus far successfully transformed eight art pieces. The item for today’s exploration is a 5 1/2” x 9 5/8” fiber art quilt known as Fuzzy, Art Piece # 62. The targeted size is an 11” x 14” stretched canvas. Let’s see how the renovation went.

Before and After

Don’t you just love reading about and seeing the before and after photos/stories of dramatic transformations. The often times Cinderella adventures make us feel all happy inside. Well, today’s revelation I believe will accomplish just such a response. Fuzzy, Art Piece # 62 began as a small grouping of fabric scraps. Originally intended to be incorporated into a much larger art project its unique facade provided a presence that demanded attention. Rather than proceeding with the original plan I decided to turn Fuzzy into a solo art piece.

The title given to this fiber art quilt was chosen because of the frilly edged fabric in the center of the piece. As was mentioned before, I often leave small areas of fabric untouched or raw. The manufacturers edge treatment for the right-off the bolt material intrigued me. I found the exposed loopy threads so interesting that I just had to make it a design element.

Added Changes

Before beginning the retrofitting of Fuzzy I first had to remove the facings, hanging sleeve and label. Once the raw edges were exposed I could start the rehab by adding new borders. Added first was a warm gold to duplicate the already present hint of color. Next to be incorporated was an earthy orange printed with a softer orange pattern.

To meld the new additions with the original specimen I echoed the previous quilting design by embellishing the new borders with color-coordinated straight-line stitching. After making those additions, the harmonious image, of the entire package, made an already stunning project even more stately.

Take A Look

The project to transform Fuzzy from an art quilt small in stature into a specimen with a much grander appearance was relatively simple. Let’s look at the before and after images.

Fuzzy, Art Piece # 62 Before Renovation
Fuzzy, Art Piece # 62 Before Renovation
Fuzzy, Art Piece # 62 After Renovation
Fuzzy, Art Piece # 62 After Renovation

And Your Reaction Is?

I think the before and after images are great examples of how an already magnificent item can be made even more amazing by simply making a few changes. Do you agree? Share your thoughts by adding a comment.

Thank You For Visiting!

About Cindy

The world of art has always brought me joy. From my childhood explorations with chalk and paint to my creations using fabric and thread, I have utilized art as my vehicle to stretch my wings and explore the world around me.

My favorite art form has been given many names; I know it as “free-form” quilting. This direction has taken me on a journey resulting in the formation of more than 200 art pieces. Most of them center strictly around the manipulation of fabric. Some of the later pieces have added elements of hand stitchery. All of them have brought me an immense sense of joy.

I use this blog to share glimpses of my art and the environment in which it is created. Most of my art pieces are available for purchase. You may see a sampling of them at Raven’s Wish Gallery in Janesville, Wisconsin.

My art is periodically on display in a variety of venues. To learn about my current exhibits you may send an email to cindy [at] inastitchquilting [dot] com

Now go and create your own masterpiece. With warm hugs…

Cindy Anderson