Rainbow Sherbet, Art Piece 2 Renovation


I’m working on a renovation project. My goal is to breathe new life into a long list of fiber art quilts. All of the chosen items will receive not only a facelift but also be adapted to mount on a pre-stretched canvas.

The first item to receive my attention is an art quilt previously known as Paws For A Moment. I chose that name because sections of it were harvested from an unfinished Bear Paw quilt top. Those sections were then combined with an array of boldly colored fabrics.

After stripping away the binding, hanging sleeve and label I began shopping my inventory for fabrics to compliment this piece. I chose three: a raspberry floral batik, a teal Grunge and a sour apple green. All of them were selected because they were colors already present in the original design. The new borders were accented with straight-line stitching using color-coordinated threads. The refashioned fiber art quilt was then attached to a pre-stretched canvas frame.

As I stood back and admired my newly renovated project I couldn’t help but smile at its explosion of color. The vibrant pallet brought back memories of the rainbow sherbet I used to eat as a child. This childhood memory inspired me to give Paws For A Moment a new name. Here after it shall be known as Rainbow Sherbet, Art Piece # 2.

How’s that for a radical transformation! Any thoughts?

Time to get working on the next victim. 🙂

Warm wishes for a day filled with creativity!

Operation Renovation


As the title of this journal entry suggests, I’m embarking on a new adventure. If you have been following my journal then you are familiar with my recently completed series on attaching fabric art to pre-stretched canvas. If you missed the series then here’s a link to get you started. Now that the series is complete I want to put those skills to work renovating a long list of previously finished art pieces. These fiber art projects range in size from teeny tiny to darn near 30”x30”.

Are you as excited as I am?!?!

If you are already one of my followers then no worries—your updates will automatically be delivered. Those that are not can easily solve that situation by signing up to join. This is going to be a jaw-dropping, eye-opening adventure!

I can’t wait to get the ball rolling!

Warn wishes for a creative art-filled day!

Canvas Mounted Fabric Art Part Four


finishing a fiber art piece

Most fabric art pieces have raw edges that require finishing. I’ve used a variety of techniques to accomplish this task. My newest and most interesting method is to mount the project onto pre-stretched canvas. I recently shared three posts titled

Contained within those narratives were details on how to prepare for and attach your art piece to a canvas. Below is the fourth and final installment. Without any further delay let’s wrap this project up.

before getting started

Welcome to the fourth installment in my tutorial on attaching a fiber art piece to a pre-stretched canvas. If you have not read and accomplished the steps contained within the first three editions I highly recommend you do so now. For those that have already completed the previous tasks let’s get started on today’s project.

Let’s Add Finishing Touches

Left to finish on our project is the dust cover, hanging apparatus, bumpers and signature.

Supplies Needed
  1. A Ruler
  2. Pencil
  3. Dust cover material
  4. Double sided tape
  5. Scissors for cutting dust cover (or dedicated rotary cutter)
  6. Smooth edged tool to help affix the tape and paper together
  7. Hanging apparatus (see below for suggestions)
  8. Wire
  9. Wire cutter (if using wire)
  10. Awl or drill
  11. Screw driver
  12. Felt or rubber bumpers for corners of frame
  13. Permanent marking pen for signing
What is a dust cover?

A dust cover is a barrier that is added to the back side of a frame. It serves several purposes:

it camouflages the unfinished side of the frame and

provides a barrier to prevent dust accumulation, among others things.

The application of a dust cover is optional. I add a cover because I like the polished appearance it adds to my framed art piece.

what is a dust cover made of?

Dust covers can be made from several products. The most common and least expensive is brown Kraft paper. Many professionals choose not to use it because it will, over time, deteriorate. There are other options available. I use Lineco Backing Paper from Blick. Choose the product that suits your budget and your intended outcome.

In my practice dust covers are adhered to the back of my projects with double sided tape. Lineco Hand Held ATG Tape is my preferred product. I’ve tried Scotch double sided tape but have not had much success.

Let’s add a dust cover
  1. Start with a clean dry surface.
  2. Lay art piece upside down on a table.
  3. Take measurements both horizontally and vertically of the area to be covered. I typically leave 1/8” uncovered all the way around my project. So…if your piece measures 8”x10” then I would cut my backing 7 3/4”x 9 3/4”.
  4. Next add strips of double sided tape to the four edges of the dust cover.
  5. When you are ready to add the dust cover don’t remove the protective backing from all of the strips of tape immediately. Only remove it from the first edge that will be adhered. When you are ready to move on to another edge then remove the protective strip from that edge. To make certain the paper adheres to the fabric I apply pressure by rubbing my fingers along the edges of the dust cover. Sometimes the tape and fabric have difficulty working together. If they are being stubborn and don’t want to adhere properly a little added massage with a smooth edged tool can make all the difference.

There, now doesn’t that make the backside of your project look so much more professional! Let’s keep moving.

hanging device

Just like with a dust cover, there are several options available for hanging your art work. Three of the most common are:

-a sawtooth hanger (jagged-edged metal strip added along top edge of your frame),

-metal screw with eyelet opening and wire (added to the sides of your frame) or

-steel D-rings and wire (also added to the sides of your frame).

The product that will last the longest and allow your art piece to lay as flat against your wall as possible is the steel D-ring. All of the products have varying sizes available. Read the package instructions to determine which one is suitable for your art piece. The D-ring and wire is the option I choose for my applications.

Attaching a D-Ring

To attach the D-ring to your frame first measure the distance between the top and bottom edges of your frame. The D-ring should be attached 1/3rd of that distance down from the top edge. Make a mark on your frame with a pencil. Using an awl or a drill, pre-drill the hole where the screws will be added.

Use a screw driver or drill to sink the screws. A screwdriver works just fine for me.

adding the wire

Before attaching the hanging wire we must determine how much wire is needed. As a general rule I measure the distance across the frame (side to side) then add eight inches. The extra length will provide enough wire to wrap around both the D-rings plus have extra slack for hanging.

To secure the wire to the D-ring take the end of the wire and pull it up through the opening of the D-ring. Next wrap the end of the wire once around itself, then pull the free end back down through the D-ring. This motion creates a slip knot which keeps the wire tight. Next, tightly wrap that same free end of the wire close to where the slip knot was formed several times. Using a wire cutters snip off the excess wire.

Repeat this process with the other D-ring. Before making the slip knot this time make sure you leave enough extra wire between the two D-rings to allow for hanging the frame on the wall. If the wire is too tight the frame will not hang properly.

bumpers

Bumpers are the small square or round pieces that are attached to the back of your art piece in the two bottom corners. Bumpers provide air circulation between the wall and your frame, and help to keep the frame straight on the wall. Bumpers can be made from either felt of plastic. Either one is suitable.

To apply them first remove the paper backing (if there is one). Next using gentle pressure attach them to one of the bottom corners on the backside of the frame. Repeat the process in the other lower corner.

Signature

There are varying opinions on whether you should

sign or print your name;

include your full or partial name,

and

if you are female, whether you should use your married or maiden name.

In this day and age, given the tendency toward identity theft, I have chosen to print my married name. I use a Micron pen. I like this type of pen/marker because it is permanent, does not typically bleed and is archival safe.

adding your name

To provide parameters for the application of my name, using a rectangle of card stock I cut out an opening equal to the length and size of my signature. Also included was space for adding the date of completion. The card stock template is placed on top of my art piece, in the area where I want to add my name. Then using my pre-selected pen I print my first and last name and completion date. I repeat this process, without the use of the template, on the back of my art.

one more thing

This next embellishment is totally optional. To the back of my canvas stretched fiber art pieces I add a card containing details about my item. Included on that card is

  • the number of the art piece (all of my art pieces are assigned a number)
  • name
  • description, including materials and thread used
  • what, if any, beads or buttons added
  • as well as the measurements of the item.

The information is printed on card stock, trimmed to size and then attached with double sided tape.

Ta Da

We have now finished the process of mounting a fiber art piece onto stretched canvas. While the steps used to complete the process can seem labor intensive the end result is well worth the effort. The technique will add a flair unlike any of the other methods used to finish an art quilt. I hope that you have found these instructions to be helpful. Feel free to leave a comment with any questions, concerns or suggestions you might have. Also, if you decide to test the process on one of your own art quilts send me a photo of your triumph. Here’s mine.

With warm wishes for a wonderful day!

© 2012-2020 Cindy Anderson and In A Stitch Quilting

Canvas Mounted Fabric Art Part Three


Most fabric art pieces have raw edges that require finishing. I’ve used a variety of techniques to accomplish this task. My newest and most interesting method is to mount the project onto pre-stretched canvas.

I recently shared two posts titled Should I and I Think It Was Successful. Contained within those narratives were details about my thought process as well as photos. As curious as I was about the technique I thought it possible that you might be as well and as a result I am embarking on a short series explaining the steps I followed. Links to the first and second tutorials have been included. Below is installment number three.

Welcome to the third installment in my tutorial on attaching a fiber art piece to a pre-stretched canvas. If you have not read and accomplished the steps contained within the first two editions I highly recommend you do so now. Links to those journals were provided above. For those that have already completed the previous tasks let’s get started on today’s project.

Attaching Your Art Piece to A Canvas

  1. Wear safety glasses.
  2. Become acquainted with the proper use of your stapler.
  3. To avoid embedding staples in your skin, make sure you hold the stapler correctly. Holding it improperly can lead to bodily injuries. Believe me this can happen; I know because I did it and it really hurts. 😦
  4. Find out what size staple works best for this task. To determine the proper size staple to use, experiment on scrap wood with several different sizes. Through a process of elimination I discovered that a 1/4” Arrow brand staple was my best option. Anything longer seemed to easily bend.
  5. To avoid getting your item dirty, make certain the surface you are placing your canvas on is clean and free of debris.
  6. On the back of your art piece use a chalk pencil, or something similar, to draw a grid locating the vertical and horizontal centers.
  7. Use those reference points to find the outer vertical and horizontal boundaries.
  8. Place your frame on top of the fabric with the right side of the canvas facing the back of your quilt.
  9. Line up the stretched canvas frame between the drawn lines.
  10. Beginning with the right vertical frame bar, gently lift up the fabric edge of your fiber art piece to wrap it up and over the bar. Insert one staple through the fabric in the center of the bar. Next turn your frame so that the left vertical edge is closest to you. Repeat the steps from above. Do the same for the horizontal top and bottom edges.
  11. Flip your canvas over and check to make sure your art piece is centered on the canvas. You can do this with either a rigid or fabric measuring device.
  12. Hopefully your beautiful fiber art quilt is situated just fine. If it is not, then make adjustments and recheck the “center.”
  13. If it is centered continue stapling, applying staples alternating from side to side and top to bottom.
  14. Be careful when tugging on the fabric. Too much force could rip your fabric or misalign your piece.
  15. Recheck the front measurements occasionally.
  16. If a staple bends (doesn’t go into frame properly) remove it. I used a screw driver, with a small tip, to gently lift the staple just enough to make it easy to pull out with a needle nose pliers.
  17. Don’t be in a hurry…take your time. You will have better success with stapling…which means less bent or misfired staples.
  18. As you approach the corners refer to this YouTube posting by Leila Gardunia. Her video explains and shows how to master corners way better than I could ever record in words.
  19. Once your corners are finished flip your mounted quilt over and admire your work. Pat yourself on the back for a job well-done! (See photos below)

We only have a few steps left to accomplish. Those tasks will be shared in my fourth installment. If you are not already a follower of my journal then take a few minutes to become one. Then you too can automatically receive updates.

I hope that you have found these instructions to be helpful. If there are questions, concerns or suggestions you would like to voice please do so through a comment. I look forward to our interaction.

With warm wishes for a wonderful day!


© 2012-2020 Cindy (Olp) Anderson and In A Stitch Quilting

Canvas Mounted Fabric Art Part Two


Most fabric art pieces have raw edges that require finishing. I’ve used a variety of techniques to accomplish this task. My newest and most interesting method is to mount the project onto pre-stretched canvas.

I recently shared two posts titled Should I and I Think It Was Successful. Contained within those narratives were details about my thought process as well as photos. As curious as I was about the technique I thought it possible that you might be as well and as a result I am embarking on a short series explaining the steps I followed. Here’s a link to the first. Below is the second.

This tutorial assumes that your fiber art piece has been squared up and has four outer edges not protected by a binding, facing or envelope type finish. Rather than using one of those methods we will be mounting the project on pre-stretched canvas.

In an ideal situation your item would fit perfectly on a canvas, with no adjustments. Of course that would mean that you pre-planned the size to accommodate the desired canvas. If your item does not fit that scenario then these instructions will help you to adapt your art piece to make it suitable for mounting. Let’s get started.

Adjusting Your Art Piece to Size

  1. Lay your art piece on a clean dry surface.
  2. Using a rigid ruler determine the length and width of your item.
  3. Next, determine the canvas size you will use to mount your project. You can find pre-stretched canvases to fit just about any budget. I purchase mine from Blick. I’ve tried canvases from the big box stores and even a USA made canvas but the brand I’ve found to be the most accurate in size and quality, for my taste, is the Blick Premier Cotton Canvas.
  4. Once you have chosen your canvas size, compare that with the measurements you made in step three above.
  5. If your project is smaller than the targeted canvas, you will need to add additional fabric. When deciding how much, make sure you take into account the fabric you will need for wrapping around the sides and back edge of the canvas frame. Usually I add eight inches to the length and width. For example: If my fiber art piece measures 20” x 20” and my stretched canvas frame measures 20” x 20” I will need to cut strips that will increase my fiber art piece to 28” x 28.” The wood used to make the frames that I typically purchase have a 1 1/2” depth and 1 1/2” width. Obviously if the depth and width of the wood strips used to make your canvas frame is smaller you could reduce that amount. Once you have had experience with this technique you will know how much wrap around fabric you need for your comfort level. Remember the famous saying: “measure twice, cut once.”
  6. If you do not need to add additional fabric, skip to step 20.
  7. After adding the necessary fabric decide whether you will add batting behind it. If not, skip to step 20.
  8. If you are adding batting you have five options to hold it in place.
  9. a. Do nothing and take your chance. (Drawback: the batting could shift)
  10. b. Use a spray on adhesive. (Drawback: it’s messy)
  11. c. Cut batting to fit and secure it in place with pins. (Drawback: pins can be annoying)
  12. d. Use fusible fleece to adhere your batting to the fabric. (Drawback: adhesive can gum up your sewing machine needle)
  13. e. Rather than fusible fleece you could secure common batting to the back of your added fabric using a fusible web such as Pellon 805. (Drawback: The process takes longer)
  14. I have tried all of the above at one time or another. The thing to remember is that chances are the project you are working with is small in size and therefore not going to take a lot of manipulation to get it ready for mounting. In that case you could gamble and simply lay the batting in place and proceed from there. If, on the other hand, you are a perfectionist like me then I would choose one of the fusibles.
  15. Now that your batting is in place decide whether you will quilt the fabric and batting sandwich. If you are quilting it then now is the time to do that. So far my choice has been to quilt the sandwich.
  16. This next step is optional. After finishing the quilting you have another decision to make. How will you treat the raw edges that extend beyond the batting: Here are three suggestions:
  17. a. Do nothing at all. This option is totally fine if you are going to add a dust cover to the back because nobody will ever see the edge anyway.
  18. b. Run a zig zag stitch around the outer edges.
  19. c. Turn under and machine stitch the outer edges.
  20. Options 18b and 19c prevent the raw edges from unraveling. However, just as with 17a, if you are adding a dust cover neither one is necessary. So far my choice has been to turn under and machine stitch the outer edges. I like the professional appearance of the finished edge.
  21. Your item is now ready to be mounted on a canvas. The instructions for this procedure will be included in a future installment. Included below are a few photos taken while prepping one of my fiber art pieces for mounting. The very last one is of my art quilt all ready to go.

I hope that this set of instructions has helped to simplify the process. Once you have tackled it for the first time your confidence will sore and your interest in using this method will be an easy one. If you have questions about my instructions or would like to see additions or corrections made, feel free to include them in a comment.

The third chapter in this series will be published soon. Don’t forget that you can receive updates automatically if you become a follower of my journal.

Until next time, warm wishes for a wonderful day!

© 2012-2020 Cindy (Olp) Anderson and In A Stitch Quilting