Flash Back: So You’re Ready to Ship/Deliver Your Quilt


Flash Back

Today we are taking a trip down memory lane. This is the fifth in the series I’m calling Flash Back. The original post was shared way back in May of 2012. I hope you will find it as informative as I do.

Congratulations!

I think I just heard your sigh of relief as you ironed that last seam.  You’ve come a long way.  All of the hurdles have been crossed and you’ve declared your project ready for quilting. Now it’s time to relax and prepare to package that awesome creation for delivery.

Who Will You Choose?

So have you chosen the lucky person that will perform this service for you?  Hopefully you will choose my studio for that function.  No matter who it is I’m confident you will be pleased with the outcome.  There’s a few more tasks that need tending before you seal that box so let’s make sure we cross off the final details from our checklist.

Don’t Just Stuff It

  • Your quilt has come a long way since that first day you were inspired. You’ve poured your time and efforts into this endeavor so don’t just stuff it into a box.
  • Both your quilt top and the backing have been carefully pressed so take care when folding them.
  • The top and backing should be folded separately.
  • If you desire, a bit of acid-free tissue could be crumpled and stuffed into the folds to help avoid excessive creasing.
  • Next I would carefully wrap each piece inside another piece of fabric or perhaps even a pillow case.
  • As an added bit of protection I would suggest that you secure your quilt and backing inside a large plastic bag.
  • Before sealing the bag make sure you insert a piece of paper with your name, address and phone number. This will insure that, in case your items were to be separated from the box, the shipper will know how to contact you.

What Should I Ship It In?

  1. Use a sturdy corrugated box.
  2. Choose one that is slightly larger than your folded bundle.
  3. If you want your finished quilt returned in the same box let your quilter know.  Perhaps you could pre-address it for her using one of the inside flaps.
  4. You might also want to lay a piece of cardboard over your quilt bundle or double box it to protect it in case a sharp knife is used to open the box.
  5. In addition you might want to include a self-addressed postcard in the box for your quilter to return to you acknowledging its safe arrival at her home.

Shipping Instructions

  • Choose your courier carefully. You want your quilt treated with care.  Having something happen because of careless handling would be devastating.
  • Make certain that your address and the address of your quilter are accurately recorded on the shipping container.
  • Do not tell the shipper or label the box in any way that will identify specifically what is inside. Quilts are prized possessions. You wouldn’t want to provide temptation for theft.
  • Purchasing insurance would be advisable as well.

Be Specific

Be very specific with your instructions to your quilter. I will always remember the time I agreed to make an article of clothing for a friend. To limit the amount of time I would spend sewing her project I asked her if she would please cut out the pattern before she dropped it off.

When she arrived I was surprised to find that her definition and my definition of “cutting out a pattern” were as far a part as the sun is from the earth. My intention was for her to locate the applicable pattern pieces, pin them on the fabric, in the appropriate way, then finally cut them out. She thought I wanted her to locate the appropriate pattern pieces and cut off the extra surrounding tissue. If I had been more specific and not assumed that we were speaking the same language we both would have had a better outcome.

One more example would be the prom dress I altered for my friend. Since I did not get exact instructions from her mother, as to how much she was willing to spend on the alterations and the fabric needed to complete them, I was left holding a check too small to cover my expenses.

The moral of my story is, be very, very specific when it comes to your expectations and ask lots and lots of questions.

If you deliver your quilt to the quilter make sure she writes everything down.  Then make sure both of you sign the sales form.  Realize also that ABSOLUTELY nobody is perfect. That includes you too!

Oh, and one more thing, don’t leave your quilt with your quilter without getting a receipt. Your receipt should include an itemized listing of your agreed upon instructions.

Time to Send it on It’s Way

I think it’s OK to close the box now. Use a generous supply of sturdy tape to secure your container. Don’t worry about your precious cargo, your quilter will take very good care of your creation and when it once again is in your home you will be so pleased.

Cindy Anderson of In A Stitch Quilting

 

So You’re Ready to Ship/Deliver Your Quilt


Congratulations!

I think I just heard your sigh of relief as you ironed that last seam.  You’ve come a long way.  All of the hurdles have been crossed and you’ve declared your project ready for quilting. Now it’s time to relax and prepare to package that awesome creation for delivery.

Who Will You Choose?

So have you chosen the lucky person that will perform this service for you?  Hopefully you will choose my studio for that function.  No matter who it is I’m confident you will be pleased with the outcome.  There’s a few more tasks that need tending before you seal that box so let’s make sure we cross off the final details from our checklist.

Don’t Just Stuff It

  • Your quilt has come a long way since that first day you were inspired. You’ve poured your time and efforts into this endeavor so don’t just stuff it into a box.
  • Both your quilt top and the backing have been carefully pressed so take care when folding them.
  • The top and backing should be folded separately.
  • If you desire, a bit of acid-free tissue could be crumpled and stuffed into the folds to help avoid excessive creasing.
  • Next I would carefully wrap each piece inside another piece of fabric or perhaps even a pillow case.
  • As an added bit of protection I would suggest that you secure your quilt and backing inside a large plastic bag.
  • Before sealing the bag make sure you insert a piece of paper with your name, address and phone number. This will insure that, in case your items were to be separated from the box, the shipper will know how to contact you.

What Should I Ship It In?

  1. Use a sturdy corrugated box.
  2. Choose one that is slightly larger than your folded bundle.
  3. If you want your finished quilt returned in the same box let your quilter know.  Perhaps you could pre-address it for her using one of the inside flaps.
  4. You might also want to lay a piece of cardboard over your quilt bundle or double box it to protect it in case a sharp knife is used to open the box.
  5. In addition you might want to include a self-addressed postcard in the box for your quilter to return to you acknowledging its safe arrival at her home.

Shipping Instructions

  • Choose your courier carefully. You want your quilt treated with care.  Having something happen because of careless handling would be devastating.
  • Make certain that your address and the address of your quilter are accurately recorded on the shipping container.
  • Do not tell the shipper or label the box in any way that will identify specifically what is inside. Quilts are prized possessions. You wouldn’t want to provide temptation for theft.
  • Purchasing insurance would be advisable as well.

Be Specific

Be very specific with your instructions to your quilter. I will always remember the time I agreed to make an article of clothing for a friend. To limit the amount of time I would spend sewing her project I asked her if she would please cut out the pattern before she dropped it off.

When she arrived I was surprised to find that her definition and my definition of “cutting out a pattern” were as far a part as the sun is from the earth. My intention was for her to locate the applicable pattern pieces, pin them on the fabric, in the appropriate way, then finally cut them out. She thought I wanted her to locate the appropriate pattern pieces and cut off the extra surrounding tissue. If I had been more specific and not assumed that we were speaking the same language we both would have had a better outcome.

One more example would be the prom dress I altered for my friend. Since I did not get exact instructions from her mother, as to how much she was willing to spend on the alterations and the fabric needed to complete them, I was left holding a check too small to cover my expenses.

The moral of my story is, be very, very specific when it comes to your expectations and ask lots and lots of questions.

If you deliver your quilt to the quilter make sure she writes everything down.  Then make sure both of you sign the sales form.  Realize also that ABSOLUTELY nobody is perfect. That includes you too!

Oh, and one more thing, don’t leave your quilt with your quilter without getting a receipt. Your receipt should include an itemized listing of your agreed upon instructions.

Time to Send it on It’s Way

I think it’s OK to close the box now. Use a generous supply of sturdy tape to secure your container. Don’t worry about your precious cargo, your quilter will take very good care of your creation and when it once again is in your home you will be so pleased.

Cindy Anderson of In A Stitch Quilting