Relaxation


What's Your Style

This is the thirteenth entry in my series What’s Your Style? In our everyday lives, we all have our own way of doing things; quilters are no exception to this trait. Even though there are standardized techniques to follow, when creating items with fabric, many of us choose to do our own thing. This series explores those individual habits. Let’s see what today’s question is.

Do you ever get sore muscles when you sew? I’m serious! After spending an extended time at your sewing machine do you ever develop sore muscles in your neck, shoulders and upper back? Well, I do. This is what I do to relax my tired muscles:

  • Roll my shoulders forward and backwards.
  • Raise my shoulders in unison toward my head and one at a time.
  • Head tilts, forward, backward and side-to-side.
  • Cross my right arm up and over my head to the left and then repeat with my other arm.
  • Basically I do stretches that are commonly practiced when I exercise.

Do your muscles get fatigued? What do you do to relax your muscles?

Now it’s your turn to share your opinion by adding a comment.

  • Don’t be bashful!
  • Nobody will judge you!
  • The quilt police will not come knocking on your door. 🙂
  • Let’s have some FUN!

Thank YOU for participating in this fun survey!

P.S. Are there questions you would like to discuss in future editions of this series, if so, share them in a comment.

Cindy Anderson
Cindy Anderson

 

 

Do You Use A Portable Pressing Board?


What's Your Style

This is the twelfth entry in my series What’s Your Style? In our everyday lives, we all have our own way of doing things; quilters are no exception to this trait. Even though there are standardized techniques to follow, when creating items with fabric, many of us choose to do our own thing. This series explores those individual habits. Let’s see what today’s question is.

One of my favorite quilting gadgets is the pressing board I made several years ago. I found the how-to instructions on Cristy’s blog. The board has been my preferred pressing surface ever since.

My board measures 27 1/2” x 30 1/2”. This size fits very nicely into my carrying case for my Sew Steady table. Being able to take it with me means I always have my own portable pressing surface.

Every now and then the cover needs to be replaced. Washing it would be my preferred option but the fabric becomes so stained it’s next to impossible to get clean. Unfortunately, changing the cover is not quite as easy as your regular ironing board. Instead of un-tieing a string or releasing a hook-and-loop fastener you must remove the staples securing the fabric to the back. This step is not incredibly time-consuming but it does require tools.

I tackled this project recently when my board started staining my fabrics. My cover had become scorched and stained from hours of use.

Stained Pressing Board & Fabric
Scorched Pressing Board and Stained Fabric

To change my cover I first had to gather tools. From my tool box I grabbed a screw driver and pliers. I also located a roll of duct tape, a staple gun and staples. I used the screw driver and pliers to remove the old staples. Once they were out and the old cover was removed I noticed the padding (layers of batting) were stained as well.

Stained Batting.jpgRather than adding a brand new cover over the obviously used batting I made the decision to replace the batting too.

Being a longarm quilter I have an abundance of batting scraps. Finding pieces to fit my board was very easy. After cutting batting and a new piece of duck cloth I reinstalled all four on my existing board. Using the staple gun to secure the layers was the best part. My newly covered pressing board was all ready for use. This is how my new cover looks.

Recovered Pressing Board.jpg

How lovely is that!

This is today’s question?

Do you have a portable pressing board?

Now it’s your turn to share your opinion by adding a comment.

  • Don’t be bashful!
  • Nobody will judge you!
  • The quilt police will not come knocking on your door. 🙂
  • Let’s have some FUN!

Thank YOU for participating in this fun survey!

P.S. Are there questions you would like to discuss in future editions of this series, if so, share them in a comment.

Cindy Anderson
Cindy Anderson

 

 

Do You Backstitch?


What's Your Style

This is the eleventh entry in my series called What’s Your Style? In our everyday lives, we all have our own way of doing things; quilters are no exception to this trait. Even though there are standardized techniques to follow, when creating items with fabric, many of us choose to do our own thing. This series explores those individual habits. Let’s see what today’s question is.

When stitching a seam on a sewing machine a quilter has the option to secure the seam both at the beginning and at the end by backstitching. The backstitching helps to keep the seam from opening up.

Today’s question is:

Do you backstitch your seams? Why or Why Not?

This is my response:

Being a longarm quilter I am acutely aware of the need for backstitching. When a quilt is loaded on a longarm quilt machine the top and bottom edges are secured in place using pins, clamps or a basting stitch. These techniques help to keep seams from opening up.

The seams on the left and right edges are not typically secured. In this instance it would be a great idea to make certain the seams have been backstitched. If the seams are not backstitched they have a tendency to pull apart. Another option is add a row of stitching a scant 1/4” in from the edge all the way around the quilt top and backing. This too will prevent seams from pulling apart.

For my own projects this is my methodology:

  1. If I’m stitching an item that I know will not be cut into smaller sections I usually backstitch both at the beginning and at the end of the seam.
  2. If I’m stitching a seam that will be exposed at the outer edge of my finished project I  will do backstitching.

Now it’s your turn to share your opinion by adding a comment.

  • Don’t be bashful!
  • Nobody will judge you!
  • The quilt police will not come knocking on your door. 🙂
  • Let’s have some FUN!

Thank YOU for participating in this fun survey!

P.S. Are there questions you would like to discuss in future editions of this series, if so, share them in a comment.

 

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