Do You Backstitch?


What's Your Style

This is the eleventh entry in my series called What’s Your Style? In our everyday lives, we all have our own way of doing things; quilters are no exception to this trait. Even though there are standardized techniques to follow, when creating items with fabric, many of us choose to do our own thing. This series explores those individual habits. Let’s see what today’s question is.

When stitching a seam on a sewing machine a quilter has the option to secure the seam both at the beginning and at the end by backstitching. The backstitching helps to keep the seam from opening up.

Today’s question is:

Do you backstitch your seams? Why or Why Not?

This is my response:

Being a longarm quilter I am acutely aware of the need for backstitching. When a quilt is loaded on a longarm quilt machine the top and bottom edges are secured in place using pins, clamps or a basting stitch. These techniques help to keep seams from opening up.

The seams on the left and right edges are not typically secured. In this instance it would be a great idea to make certain the seams have been backstitched. If the seams are not backstitched they have a tendency to pull apart. Another option is add a row of stitching a scant 1/4” in from the edge all the way around the quilt top and backing. This too will prevent seams from pulling apart.

For my own projects this is my methodology:

  1. If I’m stitching an item that I know will not be cut into smaller sections I usually backstitch both at the beginning and at the end of the seam.
  2. If I’m stitching a seam that will be exposed at the outer edge of my finished project I  will do backstitching.

Now it’s your turn to share your opinion by adding a comment.

  • Don’t be bashful!
  • Nobody will judge you!
  • The quilt police will not come knocking on your door. 🙂
  • Let’s have some FUN!

Thank YOU for participating in this fun survey!

P.S. Are there questions you would like to discuss in future editions of this series, if so, share them in a comment.

 

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Open, Left or Right


What's Your Style

This is the tenth entry in my series What’s Your Style? In our everyday lives, we all have our own way of doing things; quilters are no exception to this trait. Even though there are standardized techniques to follow, when creating items with fabric, many of us choose to do our own thing. This series explores those individual habits. Let’s see what today’s question is.

After stitching a seam some quilters set the seam with an iron. Setting the seam is a simple technique. The two pieces of fabric that were stitched together are then placed on a pressing surface, such as an ironing board. A warm iron is gently set on top of the closed seam then lifted. At this point the quilter must make a decision, which direction will she/he press the seam?

Open,

Left, or

Right

This is my response:

The direction I press my seams depends upon the item I am working with.

  1. If I’m working on a block that requires accurate piecing I typically press my seams open. I do this because I think they lay much flatter and as a result my block measurements are more accurate.
  2. If my seams need to be nested I press one to the left and the other to the right.
  3. If I’m creating an abstract art piece I press my seams in all different directions. The only goal is to avoid those bulky intersections that are a quilting nightmare.

Now it’s your turn to share your opinion by adding a comment.

  • Don’t be bashful!
  • Nobody will judge you!
  • The quilt police will not come knocking on your door. 🙂
  • Let’s have some FUN!

Thank YOU for participating in this fun survey!

P.S. Are there questions you would like to discuss in future editions of this series, if so, share them in a comment.

 

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Plain or Plastic?


What's Your Style

Over the last eight posts we have been having fun answering simple sewing/quilting questions. Today let’s answer question number nine.

Today’s topic is pins. Pins are a common quilting tool. Pins come in various shapes and forms. Some are very short and thin while others are not. The head of a pin can be made of metal, glass or plastic. There are ball-point and sharp point pins. There are appliqué, quilting, safety, silk, T-pins and clips. Today’s question has three parts:

  1. Do you use pins?
  2. For what purpose?
  3. What type or brand do you prefer?

As you have learned from my previous posts I am very fussy. I’ve tried to loosen up and not be so particular but it seems to be a long term process. Given my need for perfection you can be sure I use pins when stitching quilting pieces together. If I’m working with my improv projects I do not. There are no seams or points to match with improv. I like to use quilting pins as my pin of choice. I prefer these because of their larger size and the large plastic ball. I’m not as young as I used to be so the larger utensils make it easier for me. There is a drawback to the plastic heads. I’ve learned through experience that a hot iron can melt the head to your fabric. Sigh…. ;). Melted plastic doesn’t come off fabric very easy. Dah!

If by chance I am working with wool appliqué, which is very seldom, I use my teeny tiny appliqué pins.

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