I think it was successful

I recently wrote a post about a new-to-me method I wanted to explore. Should I touched on the topic of using stretched canvas to finish an art piece. I’ve heard and read so much about the concept that I decided to give it a try.

The first specimen for my experiment was this one.

Experiment # 1

Before I could proceed I had to make a number of decisions:

  • Determine current size
  • What should the final dimensions be
  • How much extra fabric would I have to add
  • Should I add batting behind the extra fabric
  • Did I want to quilt the extra fabric
  • Should I finish the raw edges of the added fabric

Once I answered all those questions I had to implement my plan. The process of checking off each of the items on my list went rather smoothly.

The next hurdle was the actual mounting on the canvas. I watched several YouTube videos and read quite a few blog posts about this topic. The videos were the most helpful. The video by Leila Gardunia was my favorite. I lost track of the number of times that I watched it. When I felt confident I could actually attempt to proceed I located our staple gun and extra staples and set the wheels in motion. Being a perfectionist I took a few try’s before I was satisfied. In the end I was rather pleased with the outcome. This is how my canvas mounted art quilt looked when I was finished.

A For Effort, AP 200
A For Effort, Art Piece # 200

Completing my first go-around with this method gave me the confidence to proceed with my second and third, and well you get the picture. Who knows…this just might be my go-to technique for all my fiber art creations.

This probably isn’t the last time you will hear me mention the topic of canvas mounted artwork. If you want to stay up-to-date with my progress then subscribe to my blog.

With warm wishes for an art filled day!

 

Ragged Edges

Thanks to Pam Beal and her Minimalist Design, Maximum Impact class my explorations in minimalistic art quilting continue.

Being shared today is my latest project measuring only 8 3/4 x 5 3/4″. Known as Ragged Edges, it was created using small stacks of raw edged fabrics. The stacks themselves are barely over 1″ square. Each small grouping has been anchored to a white fabric background with a grid of black machine stitching, a row of teal hand-applied stitches and a single teal French knot. Each stack was then surrounded with rows of hand quilting using white thread. Say hello to Ragged Edges, AP # 83.

Ragged Edges, AP # 83
Ragged Edges, AP # 83

Thank you for sharing this time with me!