Tropical Punch, Art Piece 79 Renovation


Making changes

Change does not have to be expensive; in fact it can cost you absolutely nothing. That’s what happens when I set-out to rearrange the furniture in my space. I am very fond of moving a chair here or a table there just to add a new vibe to a room. The impact of making such tiny adjustments can add so much flair to your environment yet add no expense to your budget.

I’ve been making changes to items in my portfolio since early this year. The changes are part of a movement I call Operation Renovation. Although not all of the tweaking has been without expense, the majority of the supplies have come from my present inventory.

The newest item to have been tackled measured 5 3/4” x 8 1/2”. Known as Tropical Punch, Art Piece 79 it was one of the tiniest members of the family. Let’s take a look at what transpired during the metamorphosis.

The transformation

The small footprint of Tropical Punch did not mean it had a quiet existence. The audacious color combination gave it an air of excitement unequaled by any other item in my portfolio. Even though its exuberant existence brought a smile to my heart anytime I saw it, I just knew I could add even more sparkle. So, I set out too harvest a few boisterous fabrics to add even more life to this already dancing gal.

Selected were three new borders; a jazzy yellow and gold stripe, a vibrant sour green and a tropical floral batik print. Giving those three a hug is a calming blue that echoes a color already used in the original design. Each of the added fabrics were embellished with straight-line stitching using matching colored threads. In its new form, Tropical Punch measures 16” x 20”. All of the enhancements, when combined together, add a punch that grabs your attention and doesn’t let go. The newly renovated Tropical Punch truly lives up to its name.

see for yourself

Tropical Punch, Art Piece # 79 Before Renovation
Tropical Punch, Art Piece # 79 Before Renovation
Tropical Punch, Art Piece # 79 After Renovation
Tropical Punch, Art Piece # 79 After Renovation

Now doesn’t that just make you smile from ear to ear!

thank you!

I’m so glad we had this opportunity to catchup and witness the reveal of yet another amazing transformation. I know that you are clamoring to share your enthusiasm so why not put it in writing by adding a comment. I would love to read your feedback.

About Cindy

The world of art has always brought me joy. From my childhood explorations with chalk and paint to my creations using fabric and thread, I have utilized art as my vehicle to stretch my wings and explore the world around me.

My favorite art form has been given many names; I know it as “free-form” quilting. This direction has taken me on a journey resulting in the formation of more than 200 art pieces. Most of them center strictly around the manipulation of fabric. Some of the later pieces have added elements of hand stitchery. All of them have brought me an immense sense of joy.

I use this blog to share glimpses of my art and the environment in which it is created. Most of my art pieces are available for purchase. You may see a sampling of them at Raven’s Wish Gallery in Janesville, Wisconsin.

My art is periodically on display in a variety of venues. To learn about my current exhibits you may send an email to cindy [at] inastitchquilting [dot] com

Now go and create your own masterpiece. With warm hugs…

Cindy Anderson

Fuzzy, Art Piece 62 Renovation


Edge Treatments

Fiber art quilts typically have raw edges that need finishing. There are four common techniques used to address their edges:

-leave them raw

-add a binding

-add facings

-attach it to a stretched canvas frame.

I have tried all of the above options except the first one. I’m not opposed to leaving some of the components within my art creation raw but the idea of leaving all four of the outer edges untouched is not something I am comfortable with…yet.

Favorite Method

Of all the techniques mentioned above my favorite way to finish raw edges is to attach my art quilts to a stretched canvas. I started using this method earlier this year after being frustrated with the final outcome of many of my projects. The new-to-me concept has provided a tool that has consistently produced a professionally polished look.

The Project

After experimenting with the canvas mounting process I decided to launch a project to retrofit a number of my existing art quilts for framing. The project…Operation Renovation… has thus far successfully transformed eight art pieces. The item for today’s exploration is a 5 1/2” x 9 5/8” fiber art quilt known as Fuzzy, Art Piece # 62. The targeted size is an 11” x 14” stretched canvas. Let’s see how the renovation went.

Before and After

Don’t you just love reading about and seeing the before and after photos/stories of dramatic transformations. The often times Cinderella adventures make us feel all happy inside. Well, today’s revelation I believe will accomplish just such a response. Fuzzy, Art Piece # 62 began as a small grouping of fabric scraps. Originally intended to be incorporated into a much larger art project its unique facade provided a presence that demanded attention. Rather than proceeding with the original plan I decided to turn Fuzzy into a solo art piece.

The title given to this fiber art quilt was chosen because of the frilly edged fabric in the center of the piece. As was mentioned before, I often leave small areas of fabric untouched or raw. The manufacturers edge treatment for the right-off the bolt material intrigued me. I found the exposed loopy threads so interesting that I just had to make it a design element.

Added Changes

Before beginning the retrofitting of Fuzzy I first had to remove the facings, hanging sleeve and label. Once the raw edges were exposed I could start the rehab by adding new borders. Added first was a warm gold to duplicate the already present hint of color. Next to be incorporated was an earthy orange printed with a softer orange pattern.

To meld the new additions with the original specimen I echoed the previous quilting design by embellishing the new borders with color-coordinated straight-line stitching. After making those additions, the harmonious image, of the entire package, made an already stunning project even more stately.

Take A Look

The project to transform Fuzzy from an art quilt small in stature into a specimen with a much grander appearance was relatively simple. Let’s look at the before and after images.

Fuzzy, Art Piece # 62 Before Renovation
Fuzzy, Art Piece # 62 Before Renovation
Fuzzy, Art Piece # 62 After Renovation
Fuzzy, Art Piece # 62 After Renovation

And Your Reaction Is?

I think the before and after images are great examples of how an already magnificent item can be made even more amazing by simply making a few changes. Do you agree? Share your thoughts by adding a comment.

Thank You For Visiting!

About Cindy

The world of art has always brought me joy. From my childhood explorations with chalk and paint to my creations using fabric and thread, I have utilized art as my vehicle to stretch my wings and explore the world around me.

My favorite art form has been given many names; I know it as “free-form” quilting. This direction has taken me on a journey resulting in the formation of more than 200 art pieces. Most of them center strictly around the manipulation of fabric. Some of the later pieces have added elements of hand stitchery. All of them have brought me an immense sense of joy.

I use this blog to share glimpses of my art and the environment in which it is created. Most of my art pieces are available for purchase. You may see a sampling of them at Raven’s Wish Gallery in Janesville, Wisconsin.

My art is periodically on display in a variety of venues. To learn about my current exhibits you may send an email to cindy [at] inastitchquilting [dot] com

Now go and create your own masterpiece. With warm hugs…

Cindy Anderson

Operation Renovation


As the title of this journal entry suggests, I’m embarking on a new adventure. If you have been following my journal then you are familiar with my recently completed series on attaching fabric art to pre-stretched canvas. If you missed the series then here’s a link to get you started. Now that the series is complete I want to put those skills to work renovating a long list of previously finished art pieces. These fiber art projects range in size from teeny tiny to darn near 30”x30”.

Are you as excited as I am?!?!

If you are already one of my followers then no worries—your updates will automatically be delivered. Those that are not can easily solve that situation by signing up to join. This is going to be a jaw-dropping, eye-opening adventure!

I can’t wait to get the ball rolling!

Warn wishes for a creative art-filled day!

Should I?


I’ve been creating art with fibers for a very long time. Each time I add their finishing touches I have to ask myself these questions: Should I

  • Add a binding or
  • Facing or
  • Envelope or
  • Mount it on canvas?

Typically one of the first three contenders is chosen. A binding is selected when I want to add a boundary or resting place for your eye. I choose facings when I want my piece to appear to have no ending or in other words an infinity edge. The envelope method is my go-to option when I’m feeling lazy and want to wrap things up quickly. Mounting on canvas is the newest option to be added to my techniques.

So why did I add a fourth technique to my repertoire? I’m not one to be drawn to the newest and greatest thing. Being a creature of habit I am satisfied to stick to my tried and true behavior. Learning new things takes energy and I prefer to expend that energy on creating art. Every once and a while I bust out of that boundary and divert my attention to a new direction.

I am honored to have been invited to show my art at another solo exhibit. The fiber art items that will be on display will be for sale. Isn’t that exciting! To put my best foot forward I want to showcase my work in a way that will make them appear professional. Elevating them to a higher standard, in this instance, means adding finishing touches that require more skill.

I have been searching the internet and You Tube for suggestions on how to mount a fiber art piece onto stretched canvas. Through my efforts I have discovered an exhaustive library of options. After weighing the various techniques I have decided to combine several into my own hybrid. I am currently working on my first experiment. Let’s hope that it is successful.

Mounting Art on Canvas Experiment # 1

The photo above is my first guinea pig. Next time you see this piece it will be transformed into a beautiful swan (well not exactly). ~Smile~

Thank you for your interest!

With warm regards,

Smooth Sailing


Not too long ago I shared plans to spend time sewing, shopping, and just having fun with a group of friends. Sadly my first full day has come and gone.

Almost all of my time was focused on my hand stitching pile of unfinished projects. Thankfully all of those items were finished. Take a look.

It feels so great to have crossed over that hurdle. Time to focus on other things!

Warm wishes to you!

A Study In Minimalism I and II


Lately I’ve been sharing art pieces started while in attendance at Pam Beal’s Minimalist Design, Maximum Impact class. The art quilts I’m sharing today bring my series to a close. Let’s take a look back at the other projects. Click on any of the photos to view them as a slide show.

Let’s turn now to today’s specimens. Known as A Study in Minimalism I and A Study in Minimalism II, these two were created to hang together.

A Study In Minimalism I and II, AP # 91 & 92

Of the fifteen projects created at Pam’s class I would have to say that these two are my favorites and here’s why.

  • I like their overall color schemes.
  • The colors used work harmoniously with one another.
  • Their subject matter is simple yet elegant.
  • The quilting compliments the natural lines of the units.
  • They were created to hang together.

I had a great time creating these quilts. Both started with scraps leftover from other art pieces. If you have been a follower of my blog you are aware of my fondness for raw edges and fabric fringe. The quilt on the left has three fabrics with raw edges and one even has fringe. The art piece on the left measures 19 1/2 x 9 1/2” and the quilt on the right measures 19 1/2 x 8 3/4”.

I learned so much from Pam Beal! Thank You Pam for sharing your methods and insight. Your influence will always play a role in my thought process.

Thank you for following this series!


Cobblestones II, AP # 90


Have you ever named an art project and then realized that you have already assigned the name to something else? Well, I have! Twice! The art piece I am showing you today, Cobblestones is the name I gave to Cobblestones, AP # 80.

Cobblestones, AP # 80

Both pieces were designed with the same photo in mind.

Cobblestones Street In Columbus, Ohio

While they both had the same inspiration their outcomes are totally different.

I am a spreadsheet person. By that I mean that I like to use spreadsheets to organize my life because they are much more reliable than scraps of paper. Of course their reliability hinges upon actually using the app.

After experiencing hurdles in maintaining a reliable list of my art pieces I decided to design a spreadsheet. The spreadsheet would be readily available because I could access it on all of my electronic devices—I almost always have one at my side. I was so proud of myself once the data was entered. While very few things are perfect I had high expectations that this would eliminate duplicate names.

In order for the spreadsheet to reach foolproof status one has to utilize it. Sometimes I’m lazy and resort back to pen and paper. In this instance that is exactly what happened. I was not aware of my dilemma until I sat down to bring my spreadsheet up to date. When I did, I had to make a decision—should I allow them both to maintain the same name or should I change one of them. In the end I chose to change one of the names ever so slightly. Today’s piece was given the modified name, Cobblestones II.

With the explanation for this project’s name revealed let’s take a look at the construction and design. I created my art piece while attending Pam Beal’s class Minimalist Design, Maximum Impact. Cobblestones II, as mentioned earlier, was inspired by a photo I took while attending QSDS.

Unlike it’s very colorful predasessor this art quilt was constructed using only three colors—a soft shade of blue, navy blue and bordeaux. Looking at the photo you will see that the cobblestones were fashioned from navy blue. The process of cutting and stitching the fabric back together created a woven texture or three dimensional appearance. I rather like that look. A border of soft blue was added to surround the cobblestones. Wrapping around all four sides is the bordeaux. The bordeaux creates a large negative space. This negative space creates a generous place for your eye to rest.

To finish my piece I added hand stitching using color coordinated threads. In the upper most bordeaux section I added three simple X’s. In the bottom area I echoed or replicated the cobblestones by stitching a grid pattern.

Cobblestones II, AP # 90

Cobblestones II has a very striking yet minimalist appearance. I think Pam Beal would be very pleased. Cobblestones II measures 14 1/2 x 8”.

Thank you for visiting.


Wild Flowers, AP # 73


2018 was the year I first took Heidi Parke’s class Layered Quilt. What is a layered quilt you might ask?

A layered quilt has four layers

  • a bottom layer of muslin
  • batting for the second layer
  • miscellaneous fabrics for the third layer and
  • a top layer of a transparent material such as silk organza.

The two most important layers are

  • layer three because that’s where your design resides and
  • layer four because it’s degree of transparency determines how visible your design layer will be.

Once the four layers have been assembled it is time to begin stitching.

I can’t tell you how much fun I had making my first layered quilt. After sandwiching my muslin and batting I pulled out my bags of fabric scraps and discarded threads. From the bags of scraps I pulled handfuls of fabric and began dumping them on top of the batting. No special effort was made to arrange them in a particular order. Also added were leftover scraps of thread. To top that all off I added a few strategically placed floral shaped remnants. This is how my layered quilt looked when I was finished.

Wild Flowers Ready For Stitching

With my four layers all in place it was time to start stitching. I gathered together my stockpile of decorative threads, my needles and my stitchery books and began the explorative process of adding the quilting. This was a great opportunity to try stitches that I had never used before. Learning the new stitches and watching them take shape was so amazing. The more I stitched the more I enjoyed the process.

Part of the joy was documenting my daily progress through photographs and now that my art piece is finished I am so glad that I did. While I would love to share all of the photos with you I’ve decided to share just a few.

Wild Flower Stitch Beginnings
Wild Flowers, A Closeup
Wild Flowers All Finished
Wild Flowers All Finished

The journey to create and finish this art quilt was one that I will always remember. I am so pleased with the final outcome and so happy to be able to share it with you.

Thank You for spending this time with me!

Painted Fibers, AP # 86


I have truly been blessed to attend numerous classes at the Woodland Ridge Retreat. If it were not for the continued employment of my husband the opportunities would never have occurred. Today’s story is about another one of my excursions.

Last summer I participated in the Judy Coates Perez, Paint and Print Palooza. I had a wonderful time learning how to dye, print and silk screen fabric.

I Had A Handful

Watching the applications go from start to finish was entertaining.

Folded Fabric Waiting to Dry
All Dried and Opened Up

I even designed and cut out my own foam stamp.

My Own Foam Stamp
The First Print Using My Foam Stamp

I created a minimum of 12 new blocks of fabric. These are two of my favorites.

Rather than point out all of the quilt’s wonderful features I’m going to share them with you through photos. Enjoy!

My First Block Arrangement

Eight of my favorite blocks. Click on any photo to watch a slide show of the gallery.

Last but not least, here is the finished art quilt.

Art Piece # 86: Painted Fibers

I am so pleased with the final version of my art piece. My finished art quilt measures 64 x 47”. Hidden inside this family of blocks are oodles of special features. Click on the photo to enlarge it and see the many details.

Thank You for stopping by!