Testing 1, 2, 3 Art Piece 114


Quite some time ago I participated in a class taught by Pam Beal at Woodland Ridge Retreat. The class Minimal Design, Maximum Impact focused on creating fiber art pieces that use a limited pallet of colors and/or design features. Today’s reveal has a limited color pallet but definitely not a limited number of stitches.

Testing 1, 2, 3 was assembled from test samples of four different construction methods: fabric strip manipulation, triangles, fractured circles and wedge piecing. All four were merged together to form this art quilt. The new creation was then surrounded by a border of black cotton fabric. Added for embellishment were four wool circles and a myriad of hand quilting stitches. Perle cotton was the primary thread used. To complete the fiber quilt an envelope of black cotton fabric was added to the back along with a hanging sleeve and a label with identifying features. Measuring 20 1/4” x 12 1/4” Testing 1, 2, 3 may be minimal in size but nowhere near minimal in impact.

Testing 1, 2, 3, Art Piece # 114

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With warm wishes for a wonderful day!

I think it was successful


I recently wrote a post about a new-to-me method I wanted to explore. Should I touched on the topic of using stretched canvas to finish an art piece. I’ve heard and read so much about the concept that I decided to give it a try.

The first specimen for my experiment was this one.

Experiment # 1

Before I could proceed I had to make a number of decisions:

  • Determine current size
  • What should the final dimensions be
  • How much extra fabric would I have to add
  • Should I add batting behind the extra fabric
  • Did I want to quilt the extra fabric
  • Should I finish the raw edges of the added fabric

Once I answered all those questions I had to implement my plan. The process of checking off each of the items on my list went rather smoothly.

The next hurdle was the actual mounting on the canvas. I watched several YouTube videos and read quite a few blog posts about this topic. The videos were the most helpful. The video by Leila Gardunia was my favorite. I lost track of the number of times that I watched it. When I felt confident I could actually attempt to proceed I located our staple gun and extra staples and set the wheels in motion. Being a perfectionist I took a few try’s before I was satisfied. In the end I was rather pleased with the outcome. This is how my canvas mounted art quilt looked when I was finished.

Minimalism I, Art Piece # 193

Completing my first go-around with this method gave me the confidence to proceed with my second and third, and well you get the picture. Who knows…this just might be my go-to technique for all my fiber art creations.

This probably isn’t the last time you will hear me mention the topic of canvas mounted artwork. If you want to stay up-to-date with my progress then subscribe to my blog.

With warm wishes for an art filled day!